child


child
child; Children
Progeny; offspring of parentage. Unborn or recently born human being. Wilson v. Weaver, 358 F.Supp. 1147, 1154.
At common law one who had not attained the age of fourteen years, though the meaning now varies in different statutes; e.g. child labor, support, criminal, etc. statutes. The term "child" or "children" may include or apply to: adopted, after-born, or illegitimate child; step-child; child by second or former marriage; issue.
See also delinquent child
- posthumous child
For negligence of child, See parental liability
@ childs part
A "child's part," which a widow, by statute in some states, is entitled to take in lieu of dower or the provision made for her by will, is a full share to which a child of the decedent would be entitled, subject to the debts of the estate and the cost of administration up to and including distribution.
@
@ legitimate child
Child born in lawful wedlock.
@ natural child
Child by natural relation or procreation. Child by birth, as distinguished from a child by adoption. Illegitimate children who have been acknowledged by the father.
@ posthumous child
One born after the father's death.
+ posthumous child
/postyamas chayld/ Child born after the death of his or her father.
@ quasi-posthumous child
In the civil law, one who, born during the life of his grandfather, or other male ascendant, was not his heir at the time he made his testament, but who by the death of his father became his heir in his life-time.
@ rights of unborn child
The rights of an unborn child are recognized in various different legal contexts; e.g. in criminal law, murder includes the unlawful killing of a fetus (Cal.Penal Code No. 187), and the law of property considers the unborn child in being for all purposes which are to its benefit, such as taking by will or descent. After its birth, it has been held that it may maintain a statutory action for the wrongful death of the parent. In addition, the child, if born alive, is permitted to maintain an action for the consequences of prenatal injuries, and if he dies of such injuries after birth an action will lie for his wrongful death. While certain states have allowed recovery even though the injury occurred during the early weeks of pregnancy, when the child was neither viable nor quick, Sinkler v. Kneale, 401 Pa. 267, 164 A.2d 93; Smith v. Brennan, 31 N.J. 353, 157 A.2d 497, other states require that the fetus be viable before a civil damage action can be brought on behalf of the unborn child.
@
- wrongful birth
- wrongful conception
- wrongful life
@ child abuse
Any form of cruelty to a child's physical, moral or mental well-being. Also used to describe form of sexual attack which may or may not amount to rape. Such acts are criminal offenses in most states.
See also abuse (Female child)
@ child labor laws
Network of laws on both federal and state levels prescribing working conditions for children in terms of hours and nature of work which may be performed, all designed to protect the child. Included are restrictions on number of hours that teen-agers can work during school year on school days and weekends; also specific hours during day that they can work.
@ children's court
See juvenile courts
@ child support
The legal obligation of parents to contribute to the economic maintenance, including education, of their children; enforceable in both civil and criminal contexts. In a dissolution or custody action, money paid by one parent to another toward the expenses of children of the marriage.
See also nonsupport
@ child's income tax
See Clifford trust
@ child welfare
A generic term which embraces the totality of measures necessary for a child's well being; physical, moral and mental
@

Black's law dictionary. . 1990.

Synonyms:

Look at other dictionaries:

  • child — n pl chil·dren 1: a son or daughter of any age and usu. including one formally adopted compare issue ◇ The word child as used in a statute or will is often held to include a stepchild, an illegitimate child, a person for whom one stands in loco… …   Law dictionary

  • child — W1S1 [tʃaıld] n plural children [ˈtʃıldrən] ▬▬▬▬▬▬▬ 1¦(young person)¦ 2¦(son/daughter)¦ 3¦(somebody influenced by an idea)¦ 4¦(somebody who is like a child)¦ 5 something is child s play 6 children should be seen and not heard 7 be with child …   Dictionary of contemporary English

  • Child & Co. — Child Co. Type Subsidiary Industry Private Banking and Wealth Management Founded 1664 Headquarters …   Wikipedia

  • Child — (ch[imac]ld), n.; pl. {Children} (ch[i^]l dr[e^]n). [AS. cild, pl. cildru; cf. Goth. kil[thorn]ei womb, in kil[thorn][=o] with child.] 1. A son or a daughter; a male or female descendant, in the first degree; the immediate progeny of human… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • child — [ tʃaıld ] (plural chil|dren [ tʃıldrən ] ) noun count *** 1. ) a young person from the time they are born until they are about 14 years old: The nursery has places for 30 children. The movie is not suitable for young children. He can t… …   Usage of the words and phrases in modern English

  • child — child; child·hood; child·ing; child·ish; child·less; child·ly; fair·child·ite; grand·child; twi·child; un·child; child·ish·ly; child·ish·ness; child·less·ness; child·like·ness; …   English syllables

  • Child — ist der Familienname folgender Personen: Desmond Child (* 1953), US amerikanischer Songschreiber, Komponist und Produzent Eilidh Child (* 1987), britische Leichtathletin Jane Child (* 1967), kanadische Musikerin und Popularmusiksängerin Josiah… …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Child 44 —   Author(s) Tom Rob Smith Country United Kingdom …   Wikipedia

  • child — [chīld] n. pl. children [ME, pl. childre (now dial. childer; children is double pl.) < OE cild, pl. cild, cildru < IE * gelt , a swelling up < base * gel , rounded (sense development: swelling womb fetus offspring > Goth kilthei, womb …   English World dictionary

  • child — O.E. cild child, infant, from P.Gmc. *kiltham (source of Gothic kilþei womb, Dan. kuld children of the same marriage ); no certain cognates outside Germanic. Also in O.E. meaning a youth of gentle birth (archaic, usually written childe). In 16c …   Etymology dictionary


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